wetheurban:

DESIGN: The LIX Pen Lets You Draw in 3D

Art director Ismail Baran and creative director Anton Suvorov have launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund their new invention - the LIX 3D Pen.

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chocolavision:

Model-Slash-Coder Shatters a Dozen Tired Stereotypes

If you have preconceived notions about models being dumb and coders being nerdy white dudes, prepare to abandon them. Lyndsey Scott has modeled for brands like DKNY, Victoria’s Secret, Gucci and Prada. But she also knows Python, Objective C, and iOS, and builds apps in her spare time.

In a profile by Carmel Diamicis on Pando Daily, Scott explains that she graduated from Amherst College in 2006 with a dual-degree in computer science — and 3 years later, found herself modeling for Calvin Klein, as “the first ever African American to get an exclusive contract with the company for New York Fashion Week.”

But up until recently, while modeling, her tech background was kept secret. She tells Diamicis:

The industry makes an effort to reduce the model and, in a way, simplify things. The way they marketed me a lot of times was as younger than I am. They wouldn’t talk about my education, they wouldn’t talk about me… In a way I understand. Youth is valued more than a college education.

One of Scott’s apps — available in the Apple store — is called iPort, and it’s basically a digital portfolio for models. (She tells Business Insider she started coding in middle school!)As seen in this tongue-in-cheek video, Scott is not just smart and beautiful — she’s also got a sense of humor. She also wrote a moving Quora post about going from physically unattractive to physically attractive:

(via darkskinnedblackbeauty)

futurescope:

New Camera Stabilizer Could Change Cinematography Forever

Not really future, more likely tomorrow, but add this gimbal to a drone and welcome 1984. Only 15k plus the price of a drone. From Gizmodo:

A new piece of filmmaking gear was just announced that could completely re-invent the complex process of camera stabilization. It’s currently being tested and endorsed by Vincent LaForet, who’s given us a little taste of what it’s capable of.

The product is called MōVI, created by Freefly, longtime maker of crazy camera-drone equipment and stabilizers. LaForet is presenting a short film and behind-the-scenes video to illustrate its abilities, which consists of a completely custom-made gimbal and 3-axis gyroscope that digitally stabilizes the camera (a Canon 1DC in this case). It looks to be very light and portable, a far cry from giant metal arms, vests, and weights that almost the entire camera support world is based on.

Video:

[read more] [Movi]

this is amazing

(via monolithos)

Tumblr was nearly as busy as Twitter during MTV’s Video Music Awards on Sunday when it came to the sheer number of content contributors, per Union Metrics, a company that offers analytics for both platforms. The San Francisco tech firm says 1.1 million Tumblr users posted content with VMA-related keywords yesterday, while 1.3 million folks on Twitter did the same. Those figures may surprise marketers who view Twitter as the undisputed, dominant, social-media companion for TV watchers.

moshita:

Hand-Tech, Concept for a new kind of device

A technological device wearable like a glove, that uses gestures as interface.
The fabric is woven with special sensors and mini projectors that read the hand’s movements and translate them into practical functions.
Using a sequence of gestures it is possible to take pictures, make videos and display information.
The glove can also translate the sign language used by deaf people (manual communication) into sound pattern (spoken language).
Hand-tech expands the communicative power of the sign language converting an iconic gesture into a concrete action.

Francesca Barchiesi

(via designed-for-life)

littlebigdetails:

Geeklist - Shows how long it would take for your password to be cracked in the sign up form.

littlebigdetails:

Geeklist - Shows how long it would take for your password to be cracked in the sign up form.

cognizingconsciousness:


Researchers Discover that the Sleeping Brain Behaves as if it’s Remembering Something
UCLA researchers have for the first time measured the activity of a brain region known to be involved in learning, memory and Alzheimer’s disease during sleep. They discovered that this part of the brain behaves as if it’s remembering something, even under anesthesia, a finding that counters conventional theories about memory consolidation during sleep.
The research team simultaneously measured the activity of single neurons from multiple parts of the brain involved in memory formation. The technique allowed them to determine which brain region was activating other areas of the brain and how that activation was spreading, said study senior author Mayank R. Mehta, a professor of neurophysics in UCLA’s departments of neurology, neurobiology, physics and astronomy.
In particular, Mehta and his team looked at three connected brain regions in mice – the new brain or the neocortex, the old brain or the hippocampus, and the entorhinal cortex, an intermediate brain that connects the new and the old brains. While previous studies have suggested that the dialogue between the old and the new brain during sleep was critical for memory formation, researchers had not investigated the contribution of the entorhinal cortex to this conversation, which turned out to be a game changer, Mehta said. His team found that the entorhinal cortex showed what is called persistent activity, which is thought to mediate working memory during waking life, for example when people pay close attention to remember things temporarily, such as recalling a phone number or following directions.
(read more)

cognizingconsciousness:

Researchers Discover that the Sleeping Brain Behaves as if it’s Remembering Something

UCLA researchers have for the first time measured the activity of a brain region known to be involved in learning, memory and Alzheimer’s disease during sleep. They discovered that this part of the brain behaves as if it’s remembering something, even under anesthesia, a finding that counters conventional theories about memory consolidation during sleep.

The research team simultaneously measured the activity of single neurons from multiple parts of the brain involved in memory formation. The technique allowed them to determine which brain region was activating other areas of the brain and how that activation was spreading, said study senior author Mayank R. Mehta, a professor of neurophysics in UCLA’s departments of neurology, neurobiology, physics and astronomy.

In particular, Mehta and his team looked at three connected brain regions in mice – the new brain or the neocortex, the old brain or the hippocampus, and the entorhinal cortex, an intermediate brain that connects the new and the old brains. While previous studies have suggested that the dialogue between the old and the new brain during sleep was critical for memory formation, researchers had not investigated the contribution of the entorhinal cortex to this conversation, which turned out to be a game changer, Mehta said. His team found that the entorhinal cortex showed what is called persistent activity, which is thought to mediate working memory during waking life, for example when people pay close attention to remember things temporarily, such as recalling a phone number or following directions.


(read more)

(via neuroticthought)

ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

biologylair:

The above chick embryo was stained with the antibody (HNK-1) to identify the location of neural crest cells, ectodermally-derived, multipotent progenitor cells that are unique to vertebrates. These neural crest cells migrate throughout the developing embryo to give rise to different lineages of tissues.
There are four main neural crest categories:
Cranial Neural Crest - yields craniofacial mesenchyme which differentiates into cartilage, bone, cranial nerves, neuroglial, odontoblasts (cells of the teeth), and thymic cells in the cephalic region
Trunk Neural Crest - can give rise to melanocytes of the skin, the dorsal root ganglia, aortic nerve clusters, or the adrenal medulla
Vagal/Secral Neural Crest - gives rise to the parasympathetic ganglia of the digestive system
Cardiac Neural Crest -  gives rise to the muscular/connective wall of main arteries

It’s important to note that the morphological complexity of vertebrates would be impossible without highly transient neural crest cells to establish entire somatic lineages throughout the body. 


Photo Credit: University of Victoria Burke Lab

ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

biologylair:

The above chick embryo was stained with the antibody (HNK-1) to identify the location of neural crest cells, ectodermally-derived, multipotent progenitor cells that are unique to vertebrates. These neural crest cells migrate throughout the developing embryo to give rise to different lineages of tissues.

There are four main neural crest categories:

  1. Cranial Neural Crest - yields craniofacial mesenchyme which differentiates into cartilage, bone, cranial nerves, neuroglial, odontoblasts (cells of the teeth), and thymic cells in the cephalic region
  2. Trunk Neural Crest - can give rise to melanocytes of the skin, the dorsal root ganglia, aortic nerve clusters, or the adrenal medulla
  3. Vagal/Secral Neural Crest - gives rise to the parasympathetic ganglia of the digestive system
  4. Cardiac Neural Crest -  gives rise to the muscular/connective wall of main arteries
It’s important to note that the morphological complexity of vertebrates would be impossible without highly transient neural crest cells to establish entire somatic lineages throughout the body. 


Photo Credit: University of Victoria Burke Lab